Bodyshop H & S - Frequently Asked Question's

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 Breathing Air Quality

 CLP Regulations

  •  What are the new CLP Regulations?

    CLP Regulations

    CLP Regs is a new regulation for the classification, labelling and packaging of substances and mixtures came into force on 20 January 2009 in all EU Member States, including the UK. It is known by its abbreviated form, ‘the CLP Regulation’ or just plain ‘CLP’.

     

    CLP has been introduced gradually over a fairly lengthy transitional period and it applies in full from 1 June 2015. This means that the ‘old’ regs (CHIP) are currently being phased out. The CLP Regulation has applied to substances that are placed on the market since 1 December 2010.

     

    The main reason for the new regulation is to provide a 'Globally Harmonised System' on the classification and labelling of chemicals (GHS) across all European Union countries, including the UK.

     

    There is no real impact to a business that purchase all of their chemicals, paints & solvents etc from a reputable supplier and the main thing that will be noticed is the new Hazard Warning Symbols.

     

    Because the CLP Regs deal with the classification, hazard communication and packaging, it applies to all chemical substances and mixtures (such as used in bodyshops).

     

    As previously stated the CPL Regs replace the Chemicals (Hazard Information and Packaging for Supply) Regulations and a new set of hazard pictograms (quite similar to the old ones) are used: 

     

     

    Screen Shot 2015 04 27 at 18.22.24

 COSHH (Hazardous Substances)

  •  I have been told that I have to do new COSHH assessments every year, is this true?

    You do not need to carryout new COSHH assessments every year however, the COSHH Regulations do require employers to 'Review' all their risk assessments at reasonable intervals or in the light of any significant changes that may have taken place. We recommend that they are reviewed at least annually.

     

    A review of the existing COSHH assessments should identify;

    • any significant changes in the hazardous substances used in the process
    • any changes in potential exposure levels
    • any changes in who may be at risk
    • if any additional information &/or training is required
    • if the Safety Data sheet is up to date

    If no significant changes have occurred or additional risks introduced, then just write on the assessment ' Reviewed on 'date' - No significant changes & sign it.

     

    The Safety4bodyshops COSHH Assessments display the next review date & the traffic lights system changes to red exactly 1 year after completion. To review the assessments just click on the appropriate assessment & check the control measures. If no significant changes, just click close & the review is complete. Traffic light goes back to green and the new review date is displayed.

  •  What is COSHH?

    This stands for 'Control of Substances Hazardous to Health' (The COSHH Regulations require employers to either prevent or reduce their workers' exposure to substances that are hazardous to their health.

  •  Does dried paint dust (from dry sanding or in spraybooth extraction filters) contain any solvents or isocyanates?

    The dust produced from dry-sanding and the dried paint particulates captured in spraybooth extraction filters is essentially the same.  Once the sprayed 2k paint has been either low-baked or air-dried overnight, all of the solvent and hardener has evaporated leaving only the dried hard paint film - the dust trapped by the filters is dry because it has been separated (ie: extracted) from the solvent & hardeners in the 'overspray'- the only noticeable difference being that the particle size of the dust in the filters is smaller than the dust produced by sanding. 

     

    Tests carried out by the HSE's laboratory (HSL) at Buxton concluded that;

     

    1.  Isocyanates are not generated during the sanding of a cured HDI based paint

    2.  Additionally, the dust does not contain free isocyanate.

     

     

    HSL-report-on-2k-Paint-Dry-sanding.pdf

 Electrical Safety & PAT Testing

  •  I have been told that under the Electricity at Work Regulations I must have all our electric portable appliance PAT tested every year, is this true?

    The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989 require that any electrical equipment that has the potential to cause injury is maintained in a safe condition. However, the Regulations do not specify what needs to be done, by whom or how frequently (ie they don't make inspection or testing of electrical appliances a legal requirement, nor do they make it a legal requirement to undertake this annually).

     

  •  How often do portable electrical appliances need to be tested?

    There is no set time scale for the testing of portable appliances. The frequency of PAT testing depends on the type of appliances how & where they are used for example; 

     

    • An electrical appliance used in wet conditions in would be classed as high risk therefore it be wise to have it tested by a competent person at least annually if not 6 monthly.

    • A radio or computer in an office is rarely moved or unplugged therefore a thorough visual check of the cable & plug every 2 to 3 years may be appropriate.

     

    Definition of Portable Appliance:

    A ‘Portable Appliance’ is any electrical item that has a cable and fitted with a plug in order to connect it to the mains system. Once the item is plugged in it becomes part of the mains system and as such requires to be tested in accordance with the Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.

     

    Portable Appliances are used in high-risk environments such as workshops or low-risk environments such as offices etc, so all appliances in use need to be classified as either ‘High or Low risk appliances ‘ in accordance to the type of appliance, where & how it is used.  

     

    The Health & Safety Executive suggest that any appliance classified as High-risk should be visually examined regularly and tested at least once every year. Low risk items may only need periodic visual inspections and testing every 2 –4 years.  Periodic visual examinations of cables, fuses & plugs do not need to be carried out by a qualified electrician.

    High-risk portable appliances include;

    • Electrical hand-held tools 
    • 240 volt lead lamps     (not battery operated or low voltage type below 50volts AC)
    • Extension leads (which can often be run over by vehicles in workshops etc)
    • Electric Kettles
    • Floor cleaners & Vacs
    • Any portable appliance that may be used in or subjected to wet conditions

     

    Low risk items include:

    • Desktop computers
    • VDU screens
    • Photocopiers
    • Fax machines
    • Radios  (provided they are not moved regularly)
    • Desk lights 

     

    The list of appliances above is not an exhaustive list but as you can see, high-risk appliances tend to be those that are regularly handled or moved which means that there is a greater risk of damage or wear to the cable and plug. This ultimately means that there is a greater risk of an electrical shock to those persons who may use them. 

     

    Low-risk appliances such as those listed above are rarely moved and so the risk of damage to the appliance itself or the cable & plug is less. 

     

    Whilst it may be in the interest of those companies who carry out electrical testing to test every ‘conceivable portable appliance’ annually, it is not a legal requirement. From the testing carried out last year you should have an inventory of all appliances tested, the inventory should help you in listing those appliances classified as  ‘High-risk’ appliances. It is these items that should then be tested at least annually.

  •  Do 'Double insulated' electric hand tools (such as grinders etc) need to be PAT tested?

    Class II equipment is sometimes referred to as ‘double insulated’ equipment. This means that there is extra insulation within the construction of the equipment to prevent accidental contact with live parts, even if there is a fault. 

     

    Class II equipment does not need an earth connection to maintain safety. It will not need a portable appliance test, although you should ensure that user checks and visual inspections are carried out as the integrity of the equipment casing is a key safety feature. 

     

    Class II equipment is marked with this symbol: Screen Shot 2015 02 11 at 16.23.11 If you cannot see this symbol, you should assume that the item is a Class I appliance and carry out a portable appliance test. 

    See HSE info on Portable Appliance Testing

  •  How often should we have our electrical mains system tested?

    A Periodic Inspection & Test (also know as a Fixed Installation test) should be carried out often enough that there is little chance of deterioration leading to danger. Any part of an installation that has become obviously defective between tests should be de-energised until the fault can be fixed.

     

    In the vehicle repair industry, it is generally accepted that a Peridodic Inspection & Test should be carried out at interval not exceeding 5 years or upon change of occupancy. Some insurance company's insist that a Peridodic Inspection & Test is carried out every 3 years.

 EPA

  •  We now use Compliant coatings and have been told by our local EPA inspector that we now no longer have to send our VOC usage summary sheet to them so do we still need to keep any VOC usage records and, can we tell our supplier to stop sending VOC Reports every month?

    Don't get caught out! - whilst you may have been told not to send in your VOC Returns, you still need to keep records of your solvent purchases and waste solvents returned for recycling. This will be inspected by your local Environmental Officer when they carry out their annual inspection. All Local EPA inspectors have been informed by the Local Authorities Unit (LAU) that the VOC emission figures are still required so that the amount of pollution from the industry can be measured. 

     

    Our advice is that you just keep your VOC records up to date on the safety4bodyshops VOC register. It takes only a couple of minutes to enter the VOC monthly figures & waste returns - then you will never get caught out as your VOC usage will always be up to date (if you had an inspection and had to get the last 12 months worth of voc & waste figures together, it could take you all day!)

     

 Fire Safety

  •  How often should we have a fire drill?

    A fire-drill is a means of practising the emergency evacuation drills and should be carried out at least every 6 months. If a fire-drill is carried out too often, people can become complacent.

     

    It is essential that evacuation drills are carried out to test the integrity of the escape routes and to ensure that all employees are familiar with the evacuation procedures and know how to reach a place of safety. The details & results of the fire drill should be recorded in a log book. 

     

    Note:  You can record Fire-drill results & weekly fire-safety checks in the Safety4Bodyshops online Record-keeping system.

     

  •  Do we need to train all of our employees how to use fire extinguishers in case we have a fire?

    The law requires employers to ensure ‘adequate and appropriate’ fire safety measures are in place to minimise the risk of injury or loss of life in the event of a fire. As part of the appropriate measures, a sufficient number of 'Competent persons' should be nominated to provide adequate fight-fighting capability.

     

    This means having a sufficient number of employees trained how to use fire extinguishers safely and to be able to deal with a small fire within the premises.  As to what is a ‘sufficient number' really depends upon the level of risk, number of employees, size & complexity of the buildings etc.  

     

    In an averaged sized vehicle repair workshop (8 – 20 employees) it would normally be deemed as ‘appropriate’ to have at least two/three persons who are trained how to operate fire extinguishers safely. These employees would then be the 'nominated competent persons'.

     

    NOTE:  Employers must not expect employees trained in the safe use of fire extinguishers to place themselves at risk when dealing with a fire. The training should include assessing the risk & recognising unsafe situations.

  •  How many litres of cellulose gunwash can we keep in the paint-mixing room?

    The Dangerous Substances and Explosive Atmospheres Regulations 2002 (DSEAR) require the quantities of such substances to be kept to a minimum. The guiding principle is that only the minimum quantity needed for frequently occurring activities or that required for use during ½ day or one shift should be present in the workroom/working area. 

     

    In reality, the local fire officer will allow you to keep up to a maximum of 50 lts (total) of highly-flammable substances (such as cellulose thinners/gunwash etc) in the paint-mixing room provided that you have adequate ventilation to prevent a build-up of solvent vapour and; controls in place to reduce potential ignition sources and prevent leakages & spills etc. Suitable warning signs should also be displayed for this area.

     

    When not in use, containers of flammable liquids needed for current work activities should be kept closed and stored in suitable cabinets or bins of fire-resisting construction and which are designed to retain spills (110% volume of the largest vessel normally stored in it). These should be located in designated areas that are where possible away from the immediate processing area and do not jeopardise the means of escape from the workroom/working area. The flammable liquids should be stored separately from other dangerous substances that may enhance the risk of fire or compromise the integrity of the container or cabinet/bin;

     

 First Aid

  •  How many First aiders should a bodyshop have?

    The minimum requirement is at 1 Appointed Person (Normally 1 day course) Whilst this may fulfil your legal obligations, most work providers & trade organisations insist on at least 1 fully qualified first-aider ie (normally a 4 day course) - In reality, you will probably need at 2 Appointed Persons or; 1 fully qualified + 1 Appointed Person. This is to provide adequate cover for holidays & absence etc.

 Hazardous Waste

  •  Are old Spraybooth floor extraction filters closed as hazardous waste?

    Testing carried out by the HSL (HSE's own Laboratory) have shown that the dried paint dust contained within the filtration material does not contain any isocyanates or solvents and so the filters are not classified as hazardous waste.

     

    The dust produced from dry-sanding and the dried paint particulates captured in spraybooth extraction filters is essentially the same.  Once the sprayed 2k paint has been either low-baked or air-dried overnight, all of the solvent and hardener has evaporated leaving only the dried hard paint film - the dust trapped by the filters is dry because it has been separated (ie: extracted) from the solvent & hardeners in the 'overspray'- the only noticeable difference being that the particle size of the dust in the filters is smaller than the dust produced by sanding.

     

    Generally they can be double-bagged & placed in the dry waste skip.

     

    Tests carried out by the HSE's laboratory (HSL) at Buxton concluded that;

    1.  Isocyanates are not generated during the sanding of a cured HDI based paint

    2.  Additionally, the dust does not contain free isocyanate.

     

     

    HSL-report-on-2k-Paint-Dry-sanding.pdf 

 Noise at Work

  •  Should I stop employees wearing headphones in the workshops?

    More and more employees are wearing headphones at work to listen to music; if they have the volume too loud they are risking noise-induced hearing loss as a result.

     

    If headphones are worn in the course in a workshop environment such as a bodyshop then the Noise at Work Regulations 1989 apply whatever the sounds are from the headphones. Whether it be work-related or incidental entertainment, speech, rock or classical music, as far as the listener's ears and the regulations are concerned it's all noise.

     

    Can the employer be held liable?

    If an an employer is aware that an employee is listening to loud music through personal headphones then the employer should also be aware that the employee is being exposed to excessive noise levels (albeit caused by the employee by him/her self) - it is therefore a reasonable assumption that this could contribute to 'noise-induced hearing loss' (that may occur sometime in the future) -  being aware of these facts does make the employer liable which could then lead to prosecution and damages being awarded to the employee.

     

     

    HSE Logo  Extract from HSE website regards wearing of headphones in a workplace;

    HSE Case 206: Wearing personal headphones in the workplace

    The issue

    The enquirer was recently told by the company he was working for that it is against health and safety regulations to wear just one personal headphone in the work place.

    HSE Panel decision;

    There are no specific health and safety regulations that ban the use of headphones in the workplace. However, in workplaces where there are risks such as moving vehicles it seems reasonable (and is not uncommon) for the use of personal headphones to be banned on the basis of an assessment of the risk. Good employers should consult with their staff or their representatives over what is reasonable in relation to use of personal headphones and from the information available it is not clear whether this has happened.

  •  Are personal headphones classed as PPE?

    The simple answer to this is NO - because whatever the sounds are from the headphones, whether it be work-related or incidental entertainment, speech, rock or classical music, as far as the listener's ears and the regulations are concerned it's all noise. 

     

    Hearing Protection is designed to reduce noise levels and so reduces exposure to noise - music from headphones is just the opposite, it may block out the work-related noise but the person wearing them is being exposed to noise levels that the employer has no control over.

 PPE/RPE

  •  Does an Employer have to pay for safety boots?

    Safety footwear is classed as Personal Protective Equipment. If a risk assessment identifies that Safety footwear should be worn to protect the employees feet then the employer must pay for it however, the employer need only pay for basic safety footwear, if the employee wants expensive designer type then the employee should pay the difference.

  •  Do air-fed masks need to be fit-tested to ensure they fit correctly?

    No, air-fed respirators work under positive pressure therefore they do not need to be fit tested.

  •  I employ a painter who won’t wear his air-fed mask. Can I get him to sign a letter saying that he is aware of the risks to his health by not wearing his mask and that he does so at his own risk?

    No, if you did that and the employee later had health problems as a result of not wearing his mask the letter would not be a defense in any liability claim against you, in fact the letter would probably be used against you as it quite clearly shows that you were ‘aware that your employee was at risk’ and that you took no action to prevent the risk.

     

    What you should do is to issue a disciplinary letter to the employee informing him that by not wearing his air-fed mask he is in breach of The H & S at Work Act 1974 and your own Company rules etc. Include the fact that by not wearing his air-fed mask (as supplied FOC) he is at risk of serious health issues from exposure to isocyanates when spraying 2k paint materials. The letter should also give clear instructions that he must wear his air-fed mask. If the employee still continues not wearing it, re-issue the letter at least every 3 months & keep a record of it.

     

    Note: On the Safety4Bodyshops ‘online PPE/RPE Issue Record’ - there is a section for recording details of verbal & written warning regards the non-wearing of PPE/RPE.  

     

 REACH Regulations

  •  How is a vehicle repairer affected by the REACH Regulations?

    REACH: (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and restriction of Chemicals) is the system for controlling chemicals in Europe. It became law in the UK on 1st June 2007.  

     

    The main businesses affected by REACH are those who manufacture or import (from outside the EU) 1 tonne or more of any given substance each year are responsible for registering a dossier of information about that substance with the European Chemicals Agency.

     

    What is meant by manufacturer? 

    A manufacturer is somebody based in the EU/EEA that produces or extracts a substance. This could be by chemical synthesis (i.e., by reacting chemicals together), by smelting (e.g., production of metals from ores) or by extracting them from another source (e.g. from crude oil or plant material). Companies that simply blend substances together (formulators) are not generally manufacturers; however, they should check this, especially when mixing acids and bases. 

     

    The REACH Regs do not affect all businesses. Businesses that just use labelled chemical substances (from a supplier) are classed as 'Downstream users'. 

     

    Downstream Users

    Businesses such as vehicle Repair workshops are classed as 'Downstream users' and provided that you use all paints products, related substances & any other chemicals (as supplied to you by your supplier) as intended and in accordance with the manufacturers recommendations, then you are complying with the REACH Regs.

     

    The only obligation a Bodyshop has under the REACH is to ensure that all chemicals (ie; paints, solvents etc) are used for thier intended purpose & that you have access to the SDS. You do not need to register your business or the substances you use with anyone. 

     

    Extract from European Chemicals Agency’s document: Guidance for Registration under REACH - Feb 2008;

    Duties under the REACH Regulations:

    1.5.2.1 Who has registration obligations? 

    The only actors in the supply chain with registration obligations are: 

    • EU manufacturers and importers of substances on their own or in preparations. 

    • EU producers and importers of articles meeting the criteria explained in the Guidance for articles.  

    • “only representatives” established in the EU and appointed by a manufacturer, formulator or article producer established outside the EU to fulfil the registration obligations of importers (see section 1.5.3.4) 

    Although polymers are exempted from registration, manufacturers or importers of polymers have, in certain circumstances, registration obligations (see e.g. Guidance for polymers for further information) 

    Please note that after implementation of REACH by the EEA EFTA-States, the actors of those countries will have the same obligations as the EU actors.

    Example  of when registration is needed:  

    A manufacturer of a substance who uses the manufactured substance himself is a manufacturer and a downstream user. He has a duty to register each substance manufactured in quantities of 1 tonne or more per year, unless exemptions apply, and will have to include information on his own use(s) and any identified uses of his customers in his registration. 

    An importer of a preparation has to register those substances which are present in the imported preparation in quantities of 1 tonne or more per year, unless exemptions apply. He will have to include information in his registration on the identified use(s) of the substance(s) in the preparation. There is no obligation for importers of preparations to register the preparations themselves; indeed preparations cannot be registered. 

    Example of when registration is NOT needed: 

    Any person, who is using substances which he has not manufactured or imported, is a downstream user and has no obligation to register these substances. 

    An importer of a substance, a preparation or an article, who is importing from a non EU company who has appointed an “only representative” will be considered as a downstream user and therefore does not need to register. 

    A manufacturer or importer of a substance which is exempted from Title II of REACH has no obligation to register that substance.

     

    Example: 

    A company purchasing registered substances from within the EU and then formulating these into preparations (e.g. paints) would be regarded as a downstream user. In layman's terms this company might be considered to be a manufacturer of paints. However, within the context of REACH the company would not be a manufacturer of a substance and so would have no registration obligations for these substances.

     

     

 Risk Assessments

  •  How often should we re do our general risk assessments?

    The Management of Health & Safety at Works Regulations require employers to 'Review' all their risk assessments at reasonable intervals or in the light of any significant changes that may have taken place. We recommend that they are reviewed at least annually.

     

    A review of the existing assessments should identify;

    • if there have been any significant changes in either the activities or tasks carried out
    • if there are any additional hazards or risks
    • any changes regards who is at risk
    • if any additional information &/or training is required

    If no significant changes have occurred or additional risks introduced, then just write on the assessment ' Reviewed on 'date' - No significant changes & sign it.

     

    The Safety4bodyshops General Risk Assessments display the next review date & the traffic lights system automatically changes to red exactly 1 year after completion. To review the assessments just click on the appropriate assessment & check the control measures. If no significant changes, click close & the review is complete. The traffic light goes back to green and the new review date is displayed.

  •  What training & qualifications do I need to do my own risk assessments?

    You do not necessarily need any specific training or qualifications to carry out a risk assessment however, as an employer, you must appoint or nominate a competent person to help you meet your health and safety duties. This could be yourself provided you have sufficient knowledge or experience.

    You could appoint just one or; a combination of:

           > yourself
           > one or more of your employees
           > someone from outside your business 

    "Most Bodyshop Managers/Owners know their own business and with the use of Safety4Bodyshops, they have to tools & knowledge to successfully manage their own H & S"

    You may need extra help or advice if you do not have sufficient experience or knowledge in-house. You may also need extra help if the risks are particularly complex:

     

    Note: A 'Competent Person' is someone with the necessary skills, knowledge and/or experience to manage health and safety - it  does not mean 'Qualified' 

  •  I need to review our noise risk assessment, does this mean I have to get a new risk assessment done?

    A Noise assessment should be reviewed at least annually by a competent person This means that you need to look at the noise-producing tools & activities etc; to which the assessment relates to and then check if there's been "any significant changes" in the way the tools/equipment etc, are used or if there any changes in the way work processes are carried out.

    Note: A 'Competent Person'

    A competent person is someone who has sufficient training, experience and/or knowledge in relation to the task that needs doing. The level of competence required will depend on the complexity of the situation and the particular help you need. You may not have been competent enough to have carried out the initial assessment however, you may be very competent in carrying out a review.

    Reviewing the assessment:

    To do this, simply check that all the controls related to the assessment are still adequate in controlling the hazards in order to reduce the risks to the lowest reasonable level and that the controls listed are still in place and the assessment is still valid.

     

    In the case of a Noise Assessment, you need to look at the assessment and see if it is still relevant & valid ie; has there been any significant changes since the assessment was made?. A significant change could be;

    • the introduction of a new piece of noisy work equipment (something that wasn't there when the assessment was made)
    • any new or additional buildings (ie; these areas may not have been included in the original assessment)
    • any changes in employees working hours or type of work carried out   (is anyone exposed to noise for longer periods of time)
    • any changes in processes or the way the work is carried out (this could affect the exposure to noise levels)
    • has any recent health checks revealed that any employee has developed any noise-induced hearing issues? (you should be able to check this from the last Annual health check report) 

     

    Having having some tools replaced (like for like) such as; a new air-drill to replace the old one, is not really a 'significant change' (any new tools purchased should have been bought as part of your "low-noise purchase policy) 

     

     

    Recording the Review:

    This can be as simple as writing on the original assessment ie: "this assessment has been reviewed and no significant changes were found that affects the validity of the assessment". "Date it & sign it & put the next review date on it"

     

    Once 

     

 Smoke Clearance Testing

  •  Is it is legal requirement to have smoke clearance tests carried out in every spraybooth?

    The HSE have decreed that Smoke testing should be carried out in every spraybooth in order to display the Spraybooth Clearance Time ((the length of time it takes each spraybooth to clear) Whilst not yet a legal requirement, if an HSE inspector calls & tells you to have the clearance testing carried out then you better just have it done.

    Please note that this is in addition the the old LEV exam & test, it does not replace it.

 Spraybooths

  •  Do we still need to have LEV tests carried out on our spray booths?

    A thorough examination & test (commonly known as an LEV test) is still a statutory requirement under the COSHH Regs 9 (2a) The exam & test measures the air-flow to check that the booth extraction is operating as designed by the manufacturer. It should be carried out at intervals not exceeding 14 months by a competent person. 

    Failure to produce current LEV test certificates is likely to lead to prosecution by the HSE. 

  •  What tests or maintenance is required for paint spray booths?

    Spraybooths are classed as 'work-equipment' and so under the Provision & Use of Work Equipment Regs (PUWER) they must be maintained in 'good working order' and kept in a 'Good state of repair' also; under the COSHH Regs, a spraybooth is a control measure designed to prevent anyone working outside the booth from being exposed to isocyanate & solvent mists. 

     

    Legal Requirements:

     

    1)   Thorough Examintation & Test by a Competent Person: (This includes a Local Exhaust Ventilation test (LEV)

    This is normally carried out by your insurance company or by engineers appointed by them. It must be carried out at intervals not exceeding 14 months (normally done annually) All working parts are visually examined and an LEV test carried out that measures the air-flow to check that the booth extraction is operating as designed by the manufacturer.

     

    2)   Smoke-clearance test:

    Smoke clearance testing should be carried out as part of the spraybooths annual service or; you can do yourself using a party Fog Machine (available on the internet for around £50. Most Spraybooth service companies do smoke-testing during the annual service.

     

    3)  Annual servicing:

    This is to ensure that the booth is maintained in good working order.

     

    4)  Monitoring of the effectiveness of the spraybooth as a Control measure:

    (ie; in controlling isocyanate & solvent mists)

    This entails carrying out regular checks on the booth (recommended monthly) - You can use the 'online' Record-keeping section in Safety4bodyshops (Spraybooth monthly checks)

  •  I already have LEV tests carried out on the spraybooths so why is smoke clearance testing necessary?

    The LEV test (which is still a statutory requirement) measures the air-flow to check that the booth extraction is operating as designed by the manufacturer, it does not provide information regards the clearance time. The Clearance time should be clearly displayed on each booth & all relevant staff be made fully aware of the risks to health from exposure from isocyanates if they enter the booth during the clearance time without an wearing air-fed mask or if they lift up their visor whilst spraying.

  •  How often should Smoke Clearance Tests be carried out?

    HSE Guidance Notes state that smoke clearance testing should be carried out as part of the spraybooths "Thorough Examination & Test" which; should be carried out at intervals not exceeding 14 months. (Generally done annually) You can do these yourself using a party Fog Machine (available on the internet for around £50. Most Spraybooth service companies do smoke-testing during the annual service.

  •  How should I dispose of old Spraybooth floor extraction filters?

    Generally they can be double-bagged & placed in the dry waste skip however, your Hazardous Waste carrier may require some type of confirmation that the used filters are NOT classied as hazardous waste.

    We recommend that you show them a copy of the HSE report on testing of dried paint dust (link below)

     

    Testing carried out by HSE:

    Testing carried out by the HSL (HSE's own Laboratory) have shown that the dried paint dust contained within the filtration material does not contain any isocyanates or solvents and so the filters are not classified as hazardous waste.

     

    The dust produced from dry-sanding and the dried paint particulates captured in spraybooth extraction filters is essentially the same.  Once the sprayed 2k paint has been either low-baked or air-dried overnight, all of the solvent and hardener has evaporated leaving only the dried hard paint film - the dust trapped by the filters is dry because it has been separated (ie: extracted) from the solvent & hardeners in the 'overspray'- the only noticeable difference being that the particle size of the dust in the filters is smaller than the dust produced by sanding.

     

    Tests carried out by the HSE's laboratory (HSL) at Buxton concluded that;

    1.  Isocyanates are not generated during the sanding of a cured HDI based paint

    2.  Additionally, the dust does not contain free isocyanate.

     

    HSL-report-on-2k-Paint-Dry-sanding.pdf 

 Urine Testing (Biological Health Screening)

  •  How do I get urine sampling carried out for the paint staff

    You can obtain the sampling kits direct from the HSL at Buxton.  (HSE's own laboratory) You can order as many kits as you wish and they will send them out to you. Just follow the very simple instructions in order to complete the tests for your just staff then just label & return the kits to the HSL. They will send you the results together with an invoice for the number of samples they have tested.

     

    Follow this link to the  online ordering page:                                                                                                                                                              

    http://www.hsl.gov.uk/hsl-shop/sampling-kits-and-analysis

     

    Otherwise, you should find that the company that carries out your annual lung-function testing will also be able to do it for you although they will probably just use the HSL and just add in their additional costs. 

     

 Workshop Equipment (inc: Lifting Equipment)

  •  Do trolley jacks need to be tested and if so, how often?

    Trolley jacks & bottle jacks are classed as lifting equipment and so are regulated by the Lifting Operations & Lifting Equpment Regulations 1998 (LOLER). The HSE recommend that trolley & bottle jacks receive a thorough examination & test by a competent person every 12 months see HSE Document 803/69 (Guidance on the frequency of Lifting Equipment used in vehicle repair)

 H & S Terminology

  •  What does 'Reasonably Practicable' actually mean?

    This means balancing the level of risk against the measures needed to control the real risk in terms of money, time or trouble. However, you do not need to take action if it would be grossly disproportionate to the level of risk.

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